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The relationship between plasma GIP and GLP-1 levels in individuals with normal and impaired glucose tolerance

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ARTICLE DOWNLOAD

The relationship between plasma GIP and GLP-1 levels in individuals with normal and impaired glucose tolerance

10$

Chinmay S. Marathe, Hung Pham, Jessica A. Marathe, Laurence G. Trahair, Lian Huynh, Tongzhi Wu, Liza K. Phillips, Christopher K. Rayner, Michael A. Nauck, Michael Horowitz & Karen L. Jones 

Abstract

Aims

Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is released primarily from the proximal small intestine and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) from the more distal small intestine and colon. Their relative importance to the incretin effect in health has been contentious in the past, although it now appears that GIP has the dominant role. It is uncertain whether there is a relationship between GIP and GLP-1 secretion. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between plasma GIP and GLP-1 responses to a 75-g oral glucose load in individuals with normal (NGT) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT).

Methods

One hundred healthy subjects had measurements of blood glucose, serum insulin, plasma GIP and GLP-1 concentrations for 240 min after a 300 mL drink containing 75 g glucose.

Results

Fifty had NGT and 41 IGT; 9 had type 2 diabetes and were excluded from analysis. In both groups, there were increases in plasma GIP and GLP-1 following the glucose drink, with no difference in the magnitude of the responses between t = 0–240 min. There was a weak relationship between the iAUC0–240 min for GIP and GLP-1 in the combined (r = 0.23, P = 0.015) and in the IGT (r = 0.34, P = 0.01), but not in the NGT (r = 0.15, P = 0.14) group.

Conclusions

There is a weak relationship between oral glucose-induced GIP and GLP-1 secretions in non-diabetic subjects.

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Year 2020
Language English
Format PDF
DOI 10.1007/s00592-019-01461-z