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Self-Rated Mental and Physical Health of U.S. Gulf Coast Residents

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ARTICLE DOWNLOAD

Self-Rated Mental and Physical Health of U.S. Gulf Coast Residents

10.00$

Ibraheem M. Karaye, Ashley D. Ross & Jennifer A. Horney 

Abstract

Repeated exposure to hurricanes and tropical storms likely impacts the mental and physical health of populations living along the U.S. Gulf Coast. In this study, the self-rated physical and mental health of residents in the U.S. Gulf Coast was estimated and factors associated with differences in self-rated health were identified. The 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) was administered online to a sample of 3030 residents of the U.S. Gulf Coast in December 2017. Responses were scored to calculate mental component summary scores and physical component summary scores. Multiple linear regression models were fitted to identify predictors of self-rated health among the residents. Residents of U.S. Gulf Coast States have poorer self-rated physical and mental health compared to the U.S. population. Women and respondents reporting higher perception of flood risk had worse self-rated mental health, while hurricane evacuees, adults of at least 25 years of age, those with self-reported hurricane damage, and respondents reporting higher perception of surge risk had worse self-rated physical health. Residents of U.S. Gulf Coast States have poorer self-rated health compared to national standards. These findings may have practical implications for hurricane-associated physical and mental health services planning and delivery.

Only units of this product remain
Year 2020
Language English
Format PDF
DOI 10.1007/s10900-019-00779-7