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Preoperative latent medial laxity and correction angle are crucial factors for overcorrection in medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy

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ARTICLE DOWNLOAD

Preoperative latent medial laxity and correction angle are crucial factors for overcorrection in medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy

10$

Do kyung Lee, Joon Ho Wang, Yougun Won, Young Ki Min, Sagar Jaiswal, Byung Hoon Lee & Jong-Yeup Kim 

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to determine which preoperative factors affect the postoperative change in the joint line convergence angle (JLCA) by preoperatively quantifying soft tissue laxity.

Methods

Thirty-four patients who underwent medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) with a navigation were analysed. The JLCA change after HTO was calculated using standing long-bone anteroposterior radiographs taken preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. Latent soft tissue laxity was defined as the amount of soft tissue that can be extended to valgus or varus from the weight-bearing position, and calculated by subtracting the JLCA on weight-bearing standing radiographs from that on stress radiographs. Multiple linear regression was performed to determine the preoperative factors that statistically correlated with the postoperative JLCA change.

Results

In multiple linear regression, JLCA change had a statistically significant correlation with latent medial laxity (R = 0.6) and a statistically borderline significant correlation with correction angle (R = 0.2). These imply that the postoperative JLCA change increased by 0.6° per 1° increase in latent medial laxity, and increased by 0.2° per 1° increase in correction angle. Latent medial laxity was the most crucial factor associated with postoperative JLCA changes.

Conclusion

The JLCA change could be larger in patients with large latent medial laxity or severe varus deformity requiring a large correction, which could lead to unexpected overcorrection in HTO. Postoperative JLCA change should be considered in preoperative surgical planning. Target point shifting within the hypomochlion point could be a strategy to prevent overcorrection, especially in patients with large latent medial laxity.

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Year 2020
Language English
Format PDF
DOI 10.1007/s00167-019-05502-6