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Military Sexual Trauma and Intimate Partner Violence: Subtypes, Associations, and Gender Differences

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ARTICLE DOWNLOAD

Military Sexual Trauma and Intimate Partner Violence: Subtypes, Associations, and Gender Differences

10$

Mark R. Relyea, Galina A. Portnoy, Joan L. Combellick, Cynthia A. Brandt & Sally G. Haskell 

Abstract

Military sexual trauma (MST) is associated with future intimate partner violence (IPV) experiences among women Veterans. Yet, no studies have examined this relationship among men nor determined whether MST, as a sexual trauma, is more related to sexual IPV than other forms of IPV. Thus, this study examined the associations between MST, and separately military sexual harassment (MSH) and assault (MSA), with both lifetime IPV and past-year IPV (physical, sexual, and emotional) among men and women Veterans. Participants included 1094 Veterans (567 women, 524 men, 3 unknown) from a survey of post-9/11 Veterans enrolled in Veterans Administration healthcare. The survey assessed MST using the VA 2-item screen, past year IPV using the Extended-Hurt Insult Threaten Scream screener, and lifetime IPV using the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire. Chi-square tests revealed that women Veterans reported higher rates of MST, lifetime IPV, and recent sexual IPV. Men reported higher rates of recent overall IPV and recent psychological IPV. Men and women had equal rates of recent physical IPV. For men, MST was associated with lifetime IPV and recent psychological IPV. Among women, MST was associated with lifetime IPV and all forms of recent IPV, particularly sexual IPV. Moreover, IPV had a stronger relationship to MSA than to MSH. Results indicate that MST is related to IPV for men and women Veterans yet this relationship is stronger for women. Importantly, MSA appears more related to IPV than does MSH, underscoring a need to examine these variables separately in future studies.

Only units of this product remain
Year 2020
Language English
Format PDF
DOI 10.1007/s10896-019-00079-7