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Medical Male Circumcision and Associations Among Sexually Transmitted Infections Service Attendees

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ARTICLE DOWNLOAD

Medical Male Circumcision and Associations Among Sexually Transmitted Infections Service Attendees

10$

Tendesayi Kufa, Frans Radebe, Venessa Maseko, Adrian Puren & Ranmini Kularatne 

Abstract

Medical male circumcision (MMC) is a proven intervention for preventing HIV acquisition among males. We describe the circumcision status, eligibility for MMC referral and associations with HIV positivity among symptomatic males attending sexually transmitted infections (STI) services. This study was a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data collected during sentinel surveillance for STI aetiologies. In the sentinel surveillance conducted at primary care facilities located in six South African provinces, an anonymous questionnaire was administered followed by collection of appropriate genital and blood specimens for laboratory testing including HIV, rapid plasma reagin (RPR) and HSV-2 serological testing. During analysis, multivariable logistic regression was used to determine association between prevalent HIV infection and male circumcision among males who were HSV-2 AND/OR RPR serology positive and among those who were negative. A total of 847 males were included the analysis, among whom the median age was 28 years (IQR 24–32 years) with 26.3% aged < 25 years. Of these, 166 (19.6%) were medically circumcised, 350 (41.4%) traditionally circumcised while 324 (39%) were not circumcised. The yield of assessment for MMC referral was 27.7%. Overall HIV positivity was 23.1%. Compared to no circumcision, MMC had a statistically insignificant 62% lower odds of being HIV positive –among males who were HSV-2 and RPR negative- adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.38 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12–1.18], p = 0.094. Among those HSV-2 AND/OR RPR positive, MMC had a statistically insignificant 26% lower odds of being HIV positive- aOR 0.74 (95% CI 0.41–1.36), p = 0.334. In both groups HIV positivity increased with age but was positively associated with condom use at last sexual encounter [aOR 3.41 (95% CI 1.43–8.15)] and previous treatment for an STI syndrome [aOR 3.81 (95% CI 1.60–9.05)] among those HSV-2 and RPR negative. High HIV positivity and high yield of eligibility for VMMC referral among males attending STI services points to the need for better integration of HIV prevention and treatment with STI care.

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Year 2020
Language English
Format PDF
DOI 10.1007/s10461-019-02729-9