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Cholecystokinin Receptor Antagonist Therapy Decreases Inflammation and Fibrosis in Chronic Pancreatitis

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ARTICLE DOWNLOAD

Cholecystokinin Receptor Antagonist Therapy Decreases Inflammation and Fibrosis in Chronic Pancreatitis

10$

Sandeep Nadella, Victor Ciofoaia, Hong Cao, Bhaskar Kallakury, Robin D. Tucker & Jill P. Smith 

Abstract

Background and Aims

Chronic pancreatitis is associated with recurrent inflammation, pain, fibrosis, and loss of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function and risk of cancer. We hypothesized that activation of the CCK receptor contributes to pancreatitis and blockade of this pathway would improve chronic pancreatitis.

Methods

Two murine models were used to determine whether CCK receptor blockade with proglumide could prevent and reverse histologic and biochemical features of chronic pancreatitis: the 6-week repetitive chronic cerulein injection model and the modified 75% choline-deficient ethionine (CDE) diet. In the CDE-fed model, half the mice received water supplemented with proglumide, for 18 weeks. After chronic pancreatitis was established in the cerulein model, half the mice were treated with proglumide and half with water. Histology was scored in a blinded fashion for inflammation, fibrosis and acinar ductal metaplasia (ADM) and serum lipase levels were measured. RNA was extracted and examined for differentially expressed fibrosis genes.

Results

Proglumide therapy decreased pancreatic weight in the CDE diet study and the cerulein-induced chronic pancreatitis model. Fibrosis, inflammation, and ADM scores were significantly reduced in both models. Lipase values improved with proglumide but not in controls in both models. Proglumide decreased pancreas mRNA expression of amylase, collagen-4, and TGFβR2 gene expression by 44, 38, and 25%, respectively, compared to control mice.

Conclusion

New strategies are needed to decreased inflammation and reduce fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis. CCK receptor antagonist therapy may improve chronic pancreatitis by reversing fibrosis and inflammation. The decrease in ADM may reduce the risk of the development of pancreatic cancer.

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Year 2020
Language English
Format PDF
DOI 10.1007/s10620-019-05863-5