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A systematic review on the effect of work-related stressors on mental health of young workers

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ARTICLE DOWNLOAD

A systematic review on the effect of work-related stressors on mental health of young workers

10$

P. C. F. Law, L. S. Too, P. Butterworth, K. Witt, N. Reavley & A. J. Milner 

Abstract

Purpose

There is no review on the effect of work-related stressors on mental health of young workers. We systematically reviewed epidemiological evidence on this relationship.

Methods

The review searched eight databases: Embase, PubMed, Web of Science, Cinahl, Cochrane Library, Informit, PsycINFO, and Scopus from their respective start dates until May 2017. Studies that have examined a mental health outcome in relation to a work-related stressor as exposure in young workers were included. The review was reported based on the PRISMA statement.

Results

Three cross-sectional studies and six longitudinal cohort studies were included. Cross-sectional evidence showed that adverse work conditions including working overtime, job boredom, low skill variety, low autonomy, high job insecurity, and lack of reward were associated with poor mental health of young workers. Longitudinal evidence showed that high job demands, low job control, effort-reward imbalance, and low work support (men only) were associated with poor mental health. There was evidence on the contemporaneous relationship between two or more adverse work conditions and poor mental health.

Conclusions

Although more research (particularly high-quality longitudinal studies) is warranted in this area, our review indicates that work-related stressors have a negative impact on the mental health of young workers. The current review suggests that workplace interventions and policy are required to improve the quality of work for young workers.

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Year 2020
Language English
Format PDF
DOI 10.1007/s00420-020-01516-7